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Method Soap Co-Founder Creates Sustainable Milk Made From Peas

Method Soap Co-Founder Creates Sustainable Milk Made From Peas


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The milk tastes nothing like peas and is healthier than some other dairy-free alternatives

Ripple will be available at Whole Foods and Target stores nationwide.

Adam Lowry, founder of sustainable soap brand, Method, has moved to address the unsustainability of milk for his newest venture. Their first product is a dairy-free, plant-based milk, reports Food Navigator.

Co.Exist points out the massive carbon footprint of dairy, stating that a single gallon of milk takes 1,000 gallons of water to produce. On Ripple’s plant-based milk, Lowry says, “It's a lot more like dairy milk than any other dairy-alternative milk on the market.” Using a patent-pending purification process involving a combination of pH, salts, pressure, and temperature, the Ripple team has created a product that is creamy, sweet, and does not taste like peas.

The final product has eight grams of protein, the same amount as milk from cows, and a third of the saturated fat and 50 percent more calcium than dairy milk. Using peas to make milk also has a smaller carbon and water footprint than other alternatives. The company has calculated that its plant-based milk takes 96 percent less water to make than almond milk, 99 percent less than dairy milk, and 76 percent less soy milk. Its overall carbon footprint is 93 percent smaller than dairy.

On the motivation behind Ripple Foods, Lowry says, “I want to create as much good through business as I can in my career. And there comes a point at which in order to do that it makes sense to build another thing that creates social and environmental benefit, in addition to the thing that you've created. That was really the motivation behind it.”

Read more on sustainable eating and why it is important.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


The land-healing work of George Washington Carver

Ericka Lugo

In the aftermath of the Civil War, the Southeast needed a healer — someone to give back at least a little of what slavery had taken from the land and the people. Black scientist George Washington Carver stepped into that role and, in the process, revolutionized farming as we know it.

Most Americans remember him simply as the “Peanut Man,” summarizing his life’s work with what was, arguably, his least important accomplishment. Oh, sure, Carver did discover around 300 uses for peanuts, from soap to wood stains to cooking oil — but those things were almost beside the point. He didn’t set out to create new kinds of milk and paper, and, to be fair, many of his inventions never took off. (Despite misconceptions, peanut butter is not in his portfolio.) The legume played a supporting role in his bigger mission: helping Black farmers throughout the South grow enough food to sustain their families and free themselves from the oppression of sharecropping.

That noble cause led Carver to develop farming methods that increased crop yields, safeguarded ecological health, and revitalized soil ravaged by the overproduction of cotton, the linchpin of the South’s economy. No less importantly, Carver devoted much of his life to teaching formerly enslaved people how to use those techniques to achieve a measure of independence.

“Carver was one of the founders of the modern organic movement, which has changed the face of agriculture and will continue to in the future if we want to have a hospitable planet,” says Leah Penniman, a 2019 Grist 50 Fixer, co-executive director of Soul Fire Farm in Petersburg, New York, and a student of Carver’s work. “Flattening him to just a pinup with a peanut in an elementary school corridor does not do him justice.”

Monuments and colleges bear Carver’s name, yet few textbooks offer a full picture of his remarkable accomplishments, let alone address the political motivations behind his work. But recognizing them underscores the fact that the fight for environmental justice is not new, and we can learn crucial lessons from its past leaders.


Watch the video: How Method Keeps Its Soap Factory Eco-Friendly (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Kahlil

    He is certainly not human

  2. Kazirn

    Not to everybody.

  3. Reizo

    Between us, in my opinion, this is obvious. I recommend looking for the answer to your question on google.com

  4. Mojag

    There's something in there.



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